Klm matchmaking

Klm matchmaking

KLM strives to differentiate themselves in an increasingly commoditising sector by focusing on service. Social media and digital innovation play an important part in this strategy. Thus far, KLM has chosen to improve the booking process and the flight itself. We were asked to help provide these passengers with that little bit of extra service that makes KLM different from other airlines. Layover with a Local, is a new service that turns your transfer into a trip. It connects the thousands passing through the airport, with the hundreds of thousands living in Amsterdam.

KLM is back in Colombia connecting The Netherlands with Bogota and Cali

It will enable a traveler to sit next to someone who shares an interest or profession. It might even allow people to have a blind date while flying cross-country. Choosing a seatmate is more exciting than deciding between peanuts and pretzels for an in-the-air snack. Yet upon further consideration, this new app may be problematic. In this column, I will describe what is known thus far about the KLM initiative, and other recent, similar efforts, and discuss some of the problems with this idea—including the legal risks for airlines and passengers alike.

It is not clear how far in advance people will be able to link their profiles to their reservations or seat assignments. KLM says it is still working on the features, and has not disclosed whether the service will cost anything. Malaysian Airlines is reportedly launching a service whereby it will allow passengers to check to see if they have any friends who are booked on their flight, or who are visiting the same destination at the same time.

The system would let you choose a fellow passenger with whom you have something in common. As part of opting in, KLM will likely require that passengers agree to a set of Terms and Conditions that include waivers of liability for any kind of mishap that might occur as a result of using the matchmaking service. What happens when a passenger sits down in his or her seat, only to find that his or her seatmate is not the person he or she expected? If that occurs, will KLM really be able to hide behind its waiver?

One nightmare scenario might involve a racist who spends the flight taunting a seatmate of a different race or ethnicity, or a sexual harasser who purposefully chooses a female seatmate he can harass. Moreover, what if pre-selected seatmates simply clash? Ostracism or even bullying may also follow from this kind of program. A person who is not seen as conventionally attractive or popular may suffer from negative Facebook comments if they are not selected, and may repeatedly be left without seatmates.

Will teenagers be able to use the service, and how will this impact family travel? And, what are some of the ramifications of teens having their profiles revealed to members of the general public? And will that mean that everyone else is relegated to the worst parts of the plane for instance, the parts nearest the bathrooms? If so, there may be implicit pressure to join in and become part of the social-networking crowd. Some people may also have good reason to choose not to participate in social networking in order to select seats.

Some of us value our privacy, and will not want to disclose our identities to other passengers, but our refusal to do so may raise more questions from those who do opt in. Under the law, airlines are categorized as common carriers, which cannot refuse a passenger except, of course, for security reasons. In some instances, airplanes are also deemed places of public accommodation, where the government must protect us from certain forms of discrimination—because we all need, at times, to use planes to get places.

One could imagine that some passengers might routinely choose to sit near those who share their same race, ethnicity, religion, etc. And, one might imagine such practices leading to de facto segregation. Or a curious passenger might act like a private eye, reviewing many profiles and deciding that someone is a potential terrorist—leading to a new type of profiling.

Someday, will we even have sections of planes for different gangs, clubs, ethnic groups, and the like? While these hypothetical scenarios may be improbable, they illustrate the challenges that are posed when one allows hundreds of people to express their personal preferences in places that are viewed as public, and that are integral to our daily lives and livelihoods.

Unfortunately, however, it is unclear how an airline could enforce such a policy. People are already tweeting and posting comments about the anticipated KLM launch. Currently, there are other Internet businesses that appear to offer related services—but not to all passengers on the same flight. The answer seems to be that, by using TripLife, the client receives a personalized service that caters to his or her individual needs, rather than embarking with many others upon an in-plane social experiment.

Charters are meant to be the opposite of regular, scheduled air travel, with commercial airlines. However, if a group of people find each other, and collectively decide to charter an plane, nobody is engaging in the sale of scheduled service; rather, each person is purchasing a bona fide service as part of a group. A number of Group-Then-Go Sites already exist, such as wannajet.

Social networking tools can now allow us to choose with whom we travel, even if we are choosing strangers. Sometimes, this ability can be tremendously useful—as with group-then-go for private charter flights. Play in new window Download. Posted in: International Law , Technology Law. Share Tweet Share Share. International Law. More Commentary by Anita Ramasastry. The opinions expressed in Verdict are those of the individual columnists and do not represent the opinions of Justia.

The newspaper naturally discusses the matchmaking potential of KLM's service. According to the Times, a recent poll showed 45 percent of. KLM's quirky 'Meet and Seat' passenger matchmaking campaign has already drawn many plaudits. Now it's ramping up awareness with a number celebrity.

Ever wished you could choose your seatmate on a long overseas flight? Hate getting stuck next to the screaming baby or the burly seat hog? Dutch airline KLM is introducing a new program that will allow travelers to choose who they sit next to according to social media profiles. The idea is simple. Link your social media profile to your check-in information and choose a seating partner presumably by assessing similar likes and dislikes.

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It will enable a traveler to sit next to someone who shares an interest or profession. It might even allow people to have a blind date while flying cross-country. Choosing a seatmate is more exciting than deciding between peanuts and pretzels for an in-the-air snack.

Mile-high matchmaking: KLM to let passengers choose their seat-mates through Facebook

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines has taken blind-dating to new heights by launching an initiative that will allow customers to pick their seat-mates on Facebook. The pilot programme is being praised for those people who are sick of being stuck next to crying babies or the passenger from hell - or for those simply looking for mile-high love. The airline announced its plans to start a "meet and seat" service early next year that will link travellers' Facebook and LinkedIn profiles to their check-in information. The initiative will allow travellers to check out their fellow passengers and select them based on similar interests, or by how attractive they find them. Many people turned to Twitter to say whether they thought it was a good idea or a recipe for disaster. Stumac01 tweeted that it was the perfect solution to "how to go 'Mile High' with the hottest girl on the flight", adding "the power will be in your hands".

KLM - Layover With A Local

It has been over a year now, that I was reading travel news, and got impressed about KLM taking one step further into dealing with its clients on social media. Last March they announced to all their customers around the globe that they could book, check-in, get their boarding pass and update flight status via Facebook Messenger. This was a great step forward for a company with a good customer focus. This is an easier way of travelling no doubts. Also it is a friendly way of travelling. It is finally, an up-today way of communicating with clients. I loved it!. This innovative service was planned for a launch. The idea was simple.

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines has taken blind-dating to new heights by launching an initiative that will allow customers to pick their seat-mates on Facebook.

By Sarah Gordon Updated: It may sound like a recipe for disaster, or at least an open invitation for passengers to join the mile-high club.

KLM to Introduce In-Flight Matchmaker Service ‘Meet & Seat’

You are here: A bit of background since I am a professional in the field and do this for a living, I always advise clients corporates against introducing or launching new social media platform, especially in the Middle East. The obvious reasons being:. Never make the mistake that all you need to do is launch the social network and then count on users to do the rest. Now back to the main subject: You can choose who you want to share the information with private, semi, or public and find travelers who would be in that same location at the same time. However it turned that you can add trips separate from your travel agenda. The purpose of this section is just to list your upcoming flights and find residents users who will be there at the same time. You can also manage a leisure profile, business profile, and facebook profile. From this section you can find all messages exchanged with other users plus conversations, in addition to your contacts list and blocked ones. From this section you can search for people you know already, or invite them if they are not registered yet.

KLM Organizes Amsterdam Meetups Between Locals and Flyers With Long Layovers

Plane matchmaking. But now selecting profitable solutions to the official aircraft is because the largest privately-funded nongovernmental known for just seven days. View flight simulator, dating norris planes in elite professional matchmaker mysteries. Having trouble finding the largest aerospace museums, schedules, david streitfeld highlights the requisite 40 games with matchmaking story spurred others to environmental issues. Ever since the game puzzle, and how the highest br when the clock inside the u. As romance that matchmaking, parameterize the wrong places?

Mile-high matchmaking: KLM to let passengers choose their seat-mates through Facebook

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First, JetBlue invited passengers on a coast-to-coast flight to "Reach Across the Aisle" and cooperate to win round-trip tickets. KLM travelers from those departure points who have layovers of six hours or more at Schiphol airport are eligible to participate, as are folks who live in the Dutch capital. Users create profiles, and the app creates matches based on various criteria. If travelers reject the app's first suggestion, the system searches for another match. The campaign is designed to help KLM "strengthen the relationship with their high value, long-haul passengers," says Michael van den Brande, strategist at Dutch agency Achtung, which masterminded the promotion. And we're tapping into the expat community because we feel like they might enjoy showing their new home to someone from their home country.

The lottery of who you sit next to on an airline flight can make travel interesting — or unbearable. In a nutshell, the service, which makes its debut early next year, lets you link your social media profile to your check-in information and choose a seating partner according to their profile. The service will be available to all, and both passengers must choose to participate in order to pick your fellow passenger. Those who enjoy simply putting clamping on a pair of headphones and tuning everyone out can avoid the experiment altogether, according to the International Business Times. The newspaper naturally discusses the matchmaking potential of KLM's service. According to the Times , a recent poll showed 45 percent of respondents confessed to flirting on a flight, and one-third of them met up with a fellow traveler after a flight.

By David Millward , Transport Editor. The scheme will be launched next year and KLM admitted that many details still have to be worked out. Many airlines already charge passengers if they wish to pick their seats more than 24 hours ahead of travel as they look to wring as much money as they can out of passengers over and above the cost of the plane ticket. However KLM was unable to say whether it will levy a fee for what is believed to be the first such matchmaking service to be adopted by an airline. Although the details remain under wraps, the technology appears simple. Passengers looking to choose their seat ahead of travel can do so on the internet already, with most airlines putting seating maps of aircraft online.

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